Post A Week 2011: Who Deserves More Credit?

schoolThis topic is the second topic on Word Press’ Challenge. I’m skipping topic one since I only agreed to do the once a week challenge. Besides this is an easy one for me to write about as it fits nicely into the core topics of this blog. Thanks Word Press!

I believe every child with any type of difference deserves more credit, but especially those who are schooled in mainstream classrooms. They have to work at least twice as hard as their peers and many of them still excel in the classroom. Some of them are in hostile environments where they endure daily meanness from peers who don’t understand their challenges.  Sometimes they have the added challenge of teachers, counselors, and even parents who fail to understand. 

  • Can you image having to tune out noise that sounds as loud as a jack hammer and still being able to concentrate on what the teacher is saying? That is exactly what many children with sensory sensitivity do every day.
  • What if you have cerebral palsy and boys on the school bus throw open condoms in your hair while calling you names? It happened to a young child in Florida.
  • What if you are a teenager who just reached puberty, you aren’t even old enough to have really experienced the world and other children are calling you gay and telling you to go hang yourself every day?
  • What if you stand up for someone and others target you and maybe even threaten your life? All of these things have happened in our schools.
  • Don’t those who are different deserve credit for enduring and surviving against all odds?
  • For the ones who couldn’t take it anymore, don’t we owe them understanding and a different world, so no others suffer the same fate?

I think we do, so I ask you to help me see that they all get the credit they deserve. Help me to change our schools and our world to a more tolerant environment where people really try to understand and support others. You can help do this by educating yourself and your children about differences by reading books like Delightfully Different. You can do this by speaking up when you see people mistreating others. You can do this by offering a smile or even offering help instead of judging others who are different.        

Mele Kalikimaka and Hauoli Makahiki Hou 13

From the Land Where Palm Trees Sway ©dswalkerauthor

From the Land Where Palm Trees Sway ©dswalkerauthor

From the land where palm trees sway, I want to share with you my dream for the future, as I wish each of you much peace and joy during the holiday season and throughout the coming year.  I hope and pray 2011 is a year of change, where people make an honest effort to be more open minded and really try to educate themselves about differences by reading books like Delightfully Different or similar stories that explain autism spectrum and/ or other differences.

Martin Luther King, Jr. had a dream and so do I.  I dream of a world where bystanders, parents, teachers, counselors, principals, and all people stand up to bullies and their parents and let them know it truly is time for change.  I dream of a world that is bully free.  I dream of a world where kindness is rewarded and more highly desired than a football championship.  Kindness, respect, understanding and acceptance should have a greater value in our society.  In the words of Tiny Tim, “God bless us everyone.”

Did You See Santa Bully Rudolph? 2

Rudolph

Rudolph has always been one of my favorite Christmas shows, but we were too busy to watch it when it was on a week ago, so my family and I watched last night.  Thanks to my fellow bloggers, I watched it with a fresh set of eyes.

You see Laura over at The House That Asperger Built had a post about it last week which involved much blogger discussion.  It started me thinking about a lot of things that really hadn’t occurred to me before.  Now obviously everyone knows Rudolph and his buddies were not treated very well.  That I got.  What I didn’t get was how the whole show was  about being cruel to those who are different.  When you look at it that way it makes you think.

My thoughts are that at the time Rudolph was made, it probably was meant to teach tolerance, but given today’s climate, it really does seem cruel.  I can certainly see why some of my fellow bloggers would not like it, so I have some questions for you.

Do you think Rudolph should have let Santa off so easy?  Remember I’m all about forgiveness, but even I can understand why many in the blogging community would think he shouldn’t have.  Still, I think Rudolph did the right thing.  It would have been nice if Santa had really changed, but that isn’t really clear in the story.  For those watching Charlie Brown tonight, what about Lucy?  Is she a “mean girl?”  Let me know if you think of others?