Weekly Photo Challenge: Fray (Feeling It, Entering It, Exiting It) 1

Frayed_Beach_Mat
I think this little gecko was a little frayed when I chased him away from the worm bin that this frayed mat helps keep cool.

I know how he feels since I felt frayed when I entered the anti-bully fray. Eventually, I realized that I had to change my own views and support my child privately while continuing to encourage kindness and understanding even of the bullies. This change inspired my Special-Ism post, About Bullies: Bullies Are Human Too!

Yet, frustration with the slowness of society to change made me want to give up until I realized that I had to focus on peace and joy to find happiness again. The change has indeed brought joy back to our family and it has helped me to observe from afar how God continues to answer my prayers.

No, I do not feel the need to over share those answers; and no, changes have not happened as quickly as I would like. But, even our local politicians are finally getting the idea that they need to show compassion for the homeless and for all people less fortunate if they want to have support from the voters. It is refreshing to see the subtle changes. I am also grateful that the need for kindness is more openly talked about than in years past, and teaching kindness to our children is becoming more of a priority in many schools.

Mia’s grandpa taught me that there were good and bad people everywhere. I knew this was true. I hoped and prayed that there were more good than bad. I hoped one day people would accept others for who they were, not who they wanted them to be … Francesca Lung from Delightfully Different

Post inspired by The Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge:

Share a photo of what “fray” means to you — it could be a tear in a favorite pair of jeans, a street rumble just about to begin, or a friend diving into an oncoming wave at the beach.

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: (Shipping and Garden) Containers (of Local Favorites) 3

A ship is safe in harbor, but that’s not what ships are for. — William G. T. Shedd

 

We gardeners are healthy, joyous, natural creatures. We are practical, patient, optimistic. We declare our optimism every year, every season, with every act of planting. — Carol Deppe


I’m grateful to have the company of my dogs as I work in my garden.

 

Food, in the end, in our own tradition, is something holy. It’s not about nutrients and calories. It’s about sharing. It’s about honesty. It’s about identity. — Louise Fresco

The containers on the right hold crack seed. Cracked seed is a variety of dehydrated and preserved fruits originally brought to Hawaii from China and later customized for local taste buds. The favors range from sweet to salty to sour. Li hing mui, one local favorite, is a salty dried plum that has also been turned into a power used in other foods including shave ice.

Can’t wait to see what others are posting for this week’s challenge:

From “Don’t judge a book by its cover” to “Don’t look at the jug, but at what it contains” (an old Rabbinic saying), we’re constantly taught that the contents of things are more important than the vessels, wrappers, and boxes that hold them in place. This week, let’s give outer shells their due and focus our lenses on things that contain other things. — Ben Huberman