My Christmas Wish: Sweeter People and More Joy and Understanding 2

Sweet Christmas TreeI purposefully avoided posting this past week.  My meeting with the new administrator of the former school was disappointing although I was proud of how I handled myself. I wonder if he can say the same.

I lost hope in ever getting through to anyone at the school because this man is known for implementing an empathy program at his former school yet, I did not feel any compassion from him. Aloha was certainly missing from this meeting.

Still, I know there are good people in this world and my children are safe.  They are both amazing and kind despite the world and despite the former school’s attitude about doing the right thing. I am not going to pursue trying to talk sense into the senseless anymore. I have more important things to do with my time than waste it on those who seem unable to be compassionate. My family needs me to drop it, so this is my last post about my daughter’s school experience. She is happy again and is working towards her goals and that is all that really matters to me. I am grateful that we have supportive people in our lives and both of my children have good friends.

The news out of Connecticut last Friday shocked my very core and deeply saddened me. The news media continues to promote stigma instead of the need for more support and understanding, and the list goes on and on.

I pray for a kinder world for all children. I send prayers to the families in Newtown. I send out prayers that someday the rest of the world will understand that supporting children and their families should be the norm regardless of whether the child has a physical illness, a developmental delay, a neurological difference, a mental diagnosis, a physical difference, or any other difference. We support victims of senseless violence and of disease and we should, but we should also support everyone else.

I wonder what if:

  • What if Adam and his mother had support when he was younger?
  • What if assault weapons were illegal?
  • What if children saw beyond the packaging and they saw his heart when he was younger?

Would things have turned out differently last Friday? We have no way of knowing for sure. Yet, I can imagine a different outcome. I can imagine a kinder, more understanding world where everyone really is safe.

I hope I am not alone. I hope you can imagine it too. Help to change your corner of the world to a more supportive place for all. Help the Adams of the world before it is too late. Everyone deserves more kindness in this world.

Laura Nagle’s “Vectors of Autism” 2

Laura Nagle At Pacific Rim Conference ©Delightfully Different Life

Those of you who actually read my blog know who Laura is already, but here are two prior posts about her for any who missed them:

  1. Helping Fund the Dialogue to Improve Our Children’s Future
  2. Three Voices of Inspiration: Promoting Accommodation, Acceptance and Appreciation of Differences 

The documentary, Vectors of Autism is now available for purchase. Its beautiful cinematography, animation, and music score help to bring Laura’s inspirational story to life, as she identifies the challenges she has faced and offers hope and insights to others. The documentary is worth every penny!

Go to: http://lauranagle.net/Film.htm to purchase!

Delightfully Different Life to “I Wish I Didn’t Have Aspergers”: #AutismPositivity2012 Flash Blog Event 5

Dear Aspie,

I understand how you might feel that way. There are people in this world who think we should all be like them. They make others feel bad about themselves. They do not understand that you have many gifts to offer the world. I want to share with you a favorite quote I came across again recently while reading  Aspire: Discovering Your Purpose Through the Power of Words by Kevin Hall:

To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else – means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight.  

E.E. Cummings

This is the life of an Aspie, but I want you to know the fight is worthwhile.

Much of the book is Hall’s conversations with Professor Arthur Watkins, Master of Words. Hall is not learning the words for the first time, rather he is learning more about the origin of words and the power hidden within words. I am only beginning the book, but I want to share with you the definition of two words.

The Hindu word, namasté (pronounced nah-mah-STAY). According to Hall, Mahatma Gandhi once told Albert Einstein, “Namasté. It means I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides. I honor the place in you of light, love, truth, peace, and wisdom.” Hall notes, “It recognizes that no one, not one soul, in the human family is exempt from receiving gifts that are uniquely his or her own.” He goes on to describe every individual as authentic.

Arthur Watkins noted authentic comes from two words one means self and one means being. Therefore, authentic “means being yourself.”

Hall states, “Namasté salutes authenticity. Society often does not.”

I think it should.

Many are trying to change this and they are true inspirations. I wrote about some of them earlier this month for autism awareness. Please read: Three Voices of Inspiration and More Than Autism Awareness: Acceptance, Appreciation, and Accommodation So They Can Soar! 

I believe your generation will be the one to truly change the world to a kinder and more accepting place. Please stay around to see it happen and please celebrate your uniqueness for it really is a good thing.

Thoughts! 17

Thoughts ran through my head this morning. I have deep thoughts about why our children are falling behind and about why we are seeing increases in psychological and neurological diagnoses. My thoughts result from my individual experiences and from things I have read and observed over my fifty-four years.

What about You?

Have you noticed that schools, employers, and most organizations have moved from individual accomplishments to group accomplishments? Yet, historically is it individuals or groups that we recognize as world’s great inventors, scientists, mathematicians, composers, and artists?

Historically

Historically farmers tended to the crops and animals on land they owned or leased. Family stores and businesses were the norm. Previously employers judged employees by their individual accomplishments not by how the people they sat or stood next to performed. Their co-workers did not determine hiring or their wages.

Today

Today we judge others by a different standard and everyone has a vote on how everyone else performs. Even doctors in private practice are not immune since some insurance companies now determine reimbursement by surveys they send to patients. Ironically, it is not just about patient outcomes, it includes how well you like your doctor and his staff. People judge this based on whether or not the receptionist smiles or on how quickly the receptionist answers the phone, etc. It makes it easy to gang up on those who are not exactly like us or people we do not like for whatever reason.

It starts early too! Our children have more and more group projects and their classmates weigh in on how much they contributed. Imagine being different in middle school and having to deal with this scenario!

What Do You Think?

How well do those who are brilliant, but not liked do? Do they learn to play the games to fit in? Or do they turn inward and become depressed, anxious, moody, or maybe even aggressive?

What do you think? Could I be on to something here?